info@co2partners.com 612-928-4747

Turning Down Your Contrast

16 Comments

  • Richard S. Lewine Reply

    Well said, Gary. This may is particularly troubling in a school system since our kids are the ultimate recipient of this “wisdom’.

    • avatar

      Gary B Cohen Reply

      Richard so true. Any wisdom on better ways to turn it down?

  • Ken Clark Reply

    Being more right than most gives successful people the false idea that they are right all the time. Hubris is the biggest and baddest cognitive bias there is. 

    • avatar

      Gary B Cohen Reply

      Ken, What have you found to be the best solution to moderate the contrast?

  • avatar

    Michele Acker-Hocevar Reply

    How does this factor into the leader’s philosophical orientation to decision making?  For me it suggests that the leader must ensure there are a number of counter views that weigh in on different topics.  What else might it suggest? 

    • avatar

      Gary B Cohen Reply

      When you turn down the contrast you are turning down your level of importance. You are allowing the negative space to become more important. When you do this you begin to be more mindful of the whole rather than just the parts. One aspect of this is your suggestion that counter view are brought into focus. I would invite you to think about the language. Perhaps instead of counter it is alternative or even parallel views. 

    • avatar

      Gary B Cohen Reply

      Don’t over-indulge yourself. Believe others may know as much if not way more than you do. It is not just counter views it is not seeing your view as the premier view. 

  • avatar

    Ellen Weber Reply

    Great reminder here Gary and thanks for the inspiration to reach across diversity for new ideas. Would you agree that it’s often about combining intelligences and leading innovation in new ways so that you stir up the best talents in others. When this becomes the role of top leaders, wider talent follows, and the ONE HUMAN SHOW ends. Great post!

    • avatar

      Gary B Cohen Reply

      Combing creativity and intelligence seems to be supported by recent brain research. Which shows that these two functions can be at different levels in people.

  • avatar

    Ellen Weber Reply

    Great reminder here Gary and thanks for the inspiration to reach across diversity for new ideas. Would you agree that it’s often about combining intelligences and leading innovation in new ways so that you stir up the best talents in others. When this becomes the role of top leaders, wider talent follows, and the ONE HUMAN SHOW ends. Great post!

    • avatar

      Gary B Cohen Reply

      Combing creativity and intelligence seems to be supported by recent brain research. Which shows that these two functions can be at different levels in people.

  • avatar

    Ellen Weber Reply

    Great reminder here Gary and thanks for the inspiration to reach across diversity for new ideas. Would you agree that it’s often about combining intelligences and leading innovation in new ways so that you stir up the best talents in others. When this becomes the role of top leaders, wider talent follows, and the ONE HUMAN SHOW ends. Great post!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Want Exclusive Leadership Tips?

Sign up for our free newsletter to get valuable advice for achieving more. This information is only available to email insiders. Join over 10,000 people who are already in-the-know.

Scroll to Top
internal_contact